The Nation’s Report Card: Trial Urban District Assessment Reading 2011

If you are interested in issues related to the education of Native Americans, this is a wonderful report that came out in December, one of the first of The Nation’s Report Card publications.

The Nation’s Report Card:
Trial Urban District Assessment Reading 2011

This report from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) presents results from the Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) in reading. Representative samples of fourth- and eighth-grade public school students from 21 urban districts participated in the 2011 assessment. Student performance is reported as average scale scores on the NAEP reading scale and as percentages of students who attained the achievement levels set by the National Assessment Governing Board. District results are compared to results for all students attending public schools in the nation and large cities (i.e., cities with populations of 250,000 or more) overall and by race/ethnicity and eligibility for free/reduced-price school lunch. In 2011, scores for both fourth- and eighth-graders in five districts were higher than the scores for students in large cities, and scores for both grades were lower in nine districts. Among the 18 districts that also participated in the 2009 assessment, there was no significant change from 2009 to 2011 in the scores for any of the districts at grade 4, and just one district scored higher at grade 8. Scores for students in the remaining districts did not change significantly from 2009 to 2011.

December 2011
Author: National Center for Education Statistics

View or download from:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2012455

If the link does not work, copy the URL into your browser. The report is free, and contains a lot of useful information.

#educ_dr

Urban District Assessment of Mathematics 2011

If you are an educator–especially if you are an educational researcher–you should be frequenting the web site for the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) (nces.ed.gov) on a regular basis to view the latest nation-wide information on educational progress of students, containing information on both pre-K to 12, and post-secondary levels. This site has the facts on every conceivable education-related topic you could possible want to view. 

For those of you specifically interested in what is going on in American schools’ math programs, here is a wonderful publication from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). It can be downloaded free of charge from the link below. 


The Nation’s Report Card:
Trial Urban District Assessment Mathematics 2011

Representative samples of fourth- and eighth-grade public school students from 21 urban districts participated in the 2011 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in mathematics. Eighteen of the districts participating in the 2011 NAEP Trial Urban District Assessment (TUDA) participated in earlier assessment years, while three districts participated for the first time in 2011. Between 1,000 and 2,700 students in each district were assessed at grades 4 and 8.
December 2011
Author: National Center for Education Statistics

View or download the report from:
http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/pubs/dst2011/2012452.asp

If the link does not work directly, copy and paste the URL text into your browser.

#educ_dr

 

National Education Leaders: Shared Vision for the Next Generation of Teaching

Document Outlines 7 Elements Needed to Transform Teaching

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan says, “The principles outlined in the document represent ways to strengthen and elevate teaching as one of our nation’s most valued and respected professions.”

The document apparently focuses on three main goals: 1) ensuring all students are challenged to meet a high bar that prepares them for college, career, and citizenship; 2) narrowing the opportunity and access gap between more and less privileged populations of students; and, 3) preparing all students to be globally competitive

Here are the seven core principles that make up the elements of achieving these goals. They include

  • A culture of shared responsibility and leadership;
  • Recruiting top talent into schools prepared for success;
  • Continuous growth and professional development;
  • Effective teachers and principals;
  • A professional career continuum with competitive compensation;
  • Conditions that support successful teaching and learning; and
  • Engaged communities

Find the link to the document from which this data came by clicking on the link below:

National Education Leaders Release Shared Vision for the Next Generation of Teaching During the 2012 Labor Management Conference | U.S. Department of Education.

If clicking on the link above does not work for you, copy and paste the URL below into your browser.

http://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/national-education-leaders-release-shared-vision-next-generation-teaching-during

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