School Sees ‘Turnaround’ Progress in Just Two Years | ED.gov Blog

It can be done! Look what an elementary school in Kansas City, Kansas, did. A new principal, some staff changes, a new attitude, and a grant from SIG, the Schools Improvement Program–and a school that went from 45% of students in the  warning area for reading to just 2% low scorers.

Kudos to everyone who made this happen: prinicpal, teachers and support staff, and parents. You made it happen!

From the ed.gov blog:

School Sees ‘Turnaround’ Progress in Just Two Years | ED.gov Blog.

(http://www.ed.gov/blog/2012/06/school-sees-turnaround-progress-in-just-two-years/)

To be honest, I do not understand why more schools did not take advantage of a change model. Sometimes, it takes moving only a few people to make a difference. Get rid of the chronic complainers who make little or no effort to change, and you are left with people who are willing to learn and make changes in their environment that places the students and their needs first. Too many schools that received SIG funds did so by attempting changes through other models. I would be interested to see what progress was made overall by SIG category. Maybe the information is forthcoming…

#educ_dr

Achievement Gap Persists For Low-Income Students While Competing Philosophies Vie For Influence

Below is a link to a Huffington Post education blog that poses what is probably one of our biggest educational problems: the achievement and retention of low-income (especially in inner-city areas) students. One of the blogger’s statements clearly addresses the need to treat this block of students as an entity, regardless of ethnicity or cultural background. A brief search on this issue uncovers a lot of commentary, but little in the way of research and support. All we see in research is the relationship between poverty and academic achievement, but too little on the whys of this gap. Are low-income students getting equity? Are alternative schools meeting students’ needs? Are we, as a nation, doing enough to address the daily hurdles these students must clear?

Achievement Gap Persists For Low-Income Students While Competing Philosophies Vie For Influence.

URL to copy and paste into your browser if the link doesn’t work: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/23/achievement-gap-chasm-in-the-classroom_n_1613312.html?page=1

#educ_dr

Calming, Laughing, and Liking: The Amygdala and Learning « Teaching/Management

While reading through my email today, I came across this education blog titled “Calming, Laughing, and Liking: The Amygdala and Learning.” With a neuroscientist husband, my own graduate studies led me to study the relationship between the brain and learning. Sure, we all know that the brain is responsible for helping us make sense of the world, but do we really know how and why? And can parts of the brain actually prevent us from or hinder learning? This author partly addressed this question, as well as the relationship between academic and professional reading and writing. Perhaps one of the more important questions for educators, however, is

Does the teacher really do what she tells us to do?

It made me wonder if I ask my doctoral students to do something I don’t do myself–carefully read the literature in one’s field of study on a regular basis, think about what that literature means to my specific interests as well as how it adds to my knowledge, and how the article or post helps me with my own academic writing. My response was “yes” to all the questions. However, that response does not answer the question about why I, too, find it difficult to write academic or academically oriented items.

This blogger also discusses the area of the brain that might actually mediate our learning and sharing, and it is a small part of the brain called the amygdala. On learning and the amygdala, the blogger states:

we literally can’t learn when our fear centers are lit up.

and it is this little area that can prevent learning in general, and learning to write for publication (thoughtfully sharing learned information in work written in an acceptable manner), especially for academic and professional purposes.

Do I do what I tell my students to do? I definitely try, but I, too, have a fear of professionally sharing in academic environments.

Incidentally, at the end of this blog is a link to a list of readings related to the amygdala and learning.

Read on here:

via Calming, Laughing, and Liking: The Amygdala and Learning « Teaching/Management.

or copy and paste this URL into your browser: http://teachingmanagement.wordpress.com/2012/06/23/calming-liking-and-focusing-the-amygdala-and-learning/

#educ_dr