August Will Be “Connected Educator Month”

This item came across my desk in late June. U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan is declaring the entire month of August as “Connected Educator Month.” The idea is to get educators talking and learning about using technology and the Internet and sharing creative ways to connect their learners to the classroom via technology.

The site below discusses more about the intent of Connected Educator Month. Take a few minutes to read the announcement and how to become involved, whether through online forums or professional development or personal development.

via Secretary of Education Duncan Declares August “Connected Educator” Month — THE Journal.

URL: http://thejournal.com/articles/2012/06/26/education-secretary-announces-connected-educator-month.aspx

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NAEP Questions Tool v4.0

Have you ever wondered what the questions look like for the NAEP? Here’s a tool that lets your know. I found some of the questions interesting. For example, I landed on a music knowledge question. Considering that many schools are dropping their music programs because districts are losing funding, I found the “music responding” content classification to be nearly superfluous at this time. However, a lot of schools have managed to save their programs, so perhaps this content area is not so surprising. However, here’s the link to the tool. Explore, learn, and enjoy!

NAEP Questions Tool v4.0.

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/itmrlsx/detail.aspx

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Informal Learning and the Graphic Novel « Teaching/Management

Having trouble getting college student to look at research seriously? Graphic novels may be the answer. Read on.

Informal Learning and the Graphic Novel « Teaching/Management. (http://teachingmanagement.wordpress.com/2012/06/25/informal-learning-and-the-graphic-novel/)

For K-12 teachers, when I taught reading (“developmental” or for learning handicapped) I found that comics were a great way to get reluctant readers to read. The small amount of text per frame and the pictures to expand on the text helped students who were easily distracted to concentrate because text was presented in small doses, and the pictures would help give context, meaning, and focus. When I started teaching with comics, I had to pre-screen all materials myself. Within a few years, there were commercial school-oriented comics flooding the market, with the same intent: getting students to read for sustained periods of time.

If you have had similar experiences, or unique ones related to reading, please post comments. Reading is so important, and my own research found an almost perfect correlation of reading and math, that I think it is in the interest of students at all levels to keep the reading methods conversation alive. So share your success, or even your failures, with techniques you’ve used to motivate students to read or to teach reading to non-readers.

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