Duncan to Congress: Giving States Flexibility is Working | ED.gov Blog | Eleanore’s Ramblings…

Duncan to Congress: Giving States Flexibility is Working | ED.gov Blog | Eleanore’s Ramblings….

Yes, this is a repost from another blog site, originally from the Department of Education blog site at http://ed.gov/blog.  This particular post caught my eye because it speaks to a more local level of control over appropriate educational programming, based on each state’s specific educational needs.  Through participation in the Common Core of Data (CCD) via the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES, at http://nces.ed.gov/ccd), the comparison of learned skills continues so that states monitor their students’ educational achievements against those of students in other states, but they do so differently than was originally proscribed by NCLB.  Unlike in NCLB which stressed a single test to measure progress across the nation, a program of how and what is taught and assessed is developed locally, by administrators and officials who know their population best.

#educ_dr

High School Graduation Rates Rose in 2010

Great news was announced earlier this week: high school graduates rates rose to the highest point in almost 40 years.  Even more encouraging is that graduation rates among Hispanics jumped “almost 10 points since 2006,” according to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.  The information comes from a new report from NCES (the National Center of Education Statistics) on 2009-2010 graduation and dropout rates entered into the Common Core of Data.

Related information can be found on my other blog site, Eleanore’s Ramblings, in which two interesting reports from Jennifer Karan, executive director of the SAT program, are also addressed. These reports address college and career readiness and college readiness among incoming freshmen.

#educ_dr

Government Site for the Study of American Indian Education

Years ago, I was told that one of the reasons that American Indian educational issues are not studied by IES/NCES (Institute of Educational Sciences/National Center for Education Statistics) is because American Indians represent too small a proportion of the population and they are not a politically “hot” area for study. I was still a graduate student at the time, and was participating in a government-sponsored workshop on using the NCES databases–specifically the NELS:88 (National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988) database for research. Clearly, active study of educational issues related to this very important (to me) small population has not changed.

However, there is a site now that dedicated to American Indians, and it can be found through the link below. If you are interested research or research results about American Indian education issues, this may be the place to start. If enough interest is generated in the site, maybe issues related to indigenous populations will hit the forefront.

NAEP – NIES: National Indian Education Study Home.

URL: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/nies/

#educ_dr