About Dr. Ellie

Hi, and welcome! I'm Dr. Ellie. I have a doctorate in educational psychology. For over 13 years, I taught middle school level special education, reading, and social studies. My special education specialties include learning, behavioral, and emotional challenges. For 12 years, I taught at the post-secondary level, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. My main area of university teaching is research and educational psychology, and I consult on dissertation methods and analysis. Most recently, I was a mentor of doctoral learners at the University of Phoenix. Currently, I am residing in the country of St. Maarten in the Dutch Caribbean, where I have become involved in special education consulting. Hobbies include reading (especially reading and critiquing young adult fiction), quilting, and crochet. I also enjoy walking, art museums, great music (from classical to contemporary), and exploring new local places. I love photography, and am trying my hardest to become a passable picture snapper.

ETS Math Games Challenge

For those interested in K-12 mathematics, here is something that might interest you. I found a LinkedIn post in my mailbox today and thought I would share the associated link. Math now, but challenges in other ETS subject areas will surely follow.

From: http://etsgameschallenge.com/?goback=%2Egde_2013888_member_133702414

ETS is looking for developers and educators to create a game that acts as a math assessment. We’re looking for innovative ideas that produce evidence of students’ knowledge, skills, and abilities in mathematics. The assessment tasks should be based on a Learning Progression for some field of mathematics in K-12. We are providing two research-based Learning Progressions: (1) Variables and Equality (approximately Grades 5-9) and (2) Linear Functions (approximately Grades 7-10). You are invited to use either of these or supply your own for any other K-12 mathematical content.

Let your creativity flow while potentially helping students everywhere to learn through fun activities. Find out more about this contest at the link above. Share the link with fellow educators. Or follow ETS in LinkedIn here:

ETS Educational Measurement, Psychometrics and Research

URL: http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=2013888&trk=anet_ug_hm

#educ_dr

 

11 Important Issues Educators Should Follow This Election Year – Online Colleges

Below is a link to a blog dealing with important issues educators need to keep in mind as the presidential election approaches. No matter which side of an issue you are on, stay informed on these and other issues. As a critical thinker, take a few minutes to browse this blogger’s views. Keep an open mind to the issues and learn all sides.

11 Important Issues Educators Should Follow This Election Year – Online Colleges.

#educ_dr

“Open Data for College Affordability and Better Student Outcomes”

Reblogged from Homeroom, the Official Blog of the U.S. Department of Education:

Open Data for College Affordability and Better Student Outcomes

Cross-posted from the White House Blog.

The Obama Administration recently launched the Education Data Initiative to help students and their families benefit from innovation enabled by open data from the US government and other sources.  By working to make education data more available and useful to entrepreneurs and innovators, we’re confident that new products and services will continue to emerge to help American families make informed educational decisions and improve student outcomes.

The Education Data Initiative is part of a series of Open Data Initiatives—other ones include energy, health, and public safety—in which the Administration is working to help catalyze the development of innovative apps and services fueled by open data, while rigorously protecting privacy and confidentiality.

Todd Park speaks at the data jam

US Chief Technology Officer Todd Park speaks at the Education Data Jam

This week, staff from the White House, the U.S. Department of Education, and the George Washington School of Business held an Education “Data Jam” in Washington, DC.  A diverse set of educational technology experts and entrepreneurs gathered to brainstorm new applications, products, services, and product features that could be developed using open educational data to drive increases in student success.

The MyData Initiative, which encourages schools, software vendors, and others who hold student data to make it available to parents and students in electronic, machine-readable formats, was an important focus of the workshop discussion.  Allowing students to download their own data enables them to maintain their personal learning profile, access customized learning experiences, and make informed school selection and financial aid choices.  At the workshop, the Department’s Office of Federal Student Aid unveiled the MyData files it will be launching for student aid application (FAFSA) and disbursement (NSLDS) data downloads. Students will soon be able to retrieve their own student aid data in machine-readable format, which they could then share with online services that can harness the data to provide customized assistance with finding scholarships, choosing schools, or repaying loans.

The Education Data Jam also focused on Federal education data sets now available at education.data.gov.  Publicly available data about education outcomes can help fuel the next generation of customized services and tools for students, teachers, and school districts.

Data from the Learning Registry, a new open-source technical system to help educators and learners use and share digital content, was also a major subject of the brainstorm.  Developers interested in connecting student performance or teacher preparation tools to appropriate content can leverage the information stored in this crowd-sourced platform.

In wrapping up the event, we challenged participants to collaborate on building tools or services using the data demonstrated at the Data Jam.  Groups who successfully implement their ideas in the next 90 days will have an opportunity to potentially be featured at a follow-on event—an “Education Datapalooza”—that will celebrate private-sector education innovation fueled by open data.  The challenge to build innovative education tools and services, for potential demonstration at the Datapalooza, is open to everyone.  Information about the data sets presented at the Data Jam is available here.  And if you’d like more details about the Education Dataplaooza or if you have an idea or an example of a private-sector innovation (a product, service, website, app, or feature) that uses open education data, please send an email to Richard.Culatta@ed.gov.